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01 May 2017

Yom Hazikaron, Israel's Memorial Day, is the national remembrance day observed in Israel for those who fell in service since 1860, when Jews were first allowed to live in Palestine outside of Jerusalem's Old City walls. As of May 2016 that number was 23,447. National memorial services are held in the presence of Israel's top leadership and military personnel. The day opens with a siren the preceding evening at 20:00, given that in the Hebrew calendar system, a day begins at sunset. The siren is heard all over the country and lasts for one minute, during which Israelis stop everything (including driving, which stops highways) and stand in silence, commemorating the fallen and showing respect. Obsevant Jews say prayers for the souls of the fallen soldiers at this time. The official ceremony to mark the opening of the day takes place at the Western Wall, and the flag of Israel is lowered to half staff. A two-minute siren is sounded at 11:00 the following morning, which marks the opening of the official memorial ceremonies and private remembrance gatherings at each cemetery where our soldiers are buried. Israelis visit the resting places of loved ones throughout the day. The day officially draws to a close at sundown (between 19:00 and 20:00; 7–8 p.m.) in a ceremony at the national military cemetery on Mount Herzl, marking the start of Israel's Independence Day, when the flag of Israel is returned to full staff. The names of all the fallen are shown on television in chronological order (rank, name, Hebrew date deceased and secular date) over the course of the day. Names appear for about three seconds each.


Yom Hazikaron, Israel's Memorial Day, is the national remembrance day observed in Israel for those who fell in service since 1860, when Jews were first allowed to live in Palestine outside of Jerusalem's Old City walls. As of May 2016 that number was 23,447. National memorial services are held in the presence of Israel's top leadership and military personnel. The day opens with a siren the preceding evening at 20:00, given that in the Hebrew calendar system, a day begins at sunset. The siren is heard all over the country and lasts for one minute, during which Israelis stop everything (including driving, which stops highways) and stand in silence, commemorating the fallen and showing respect. Obsevant Jews say prayers for the souls of the fallen soldiers at this time. The official ceremony to mark the opening of the day takes place at the Western Wall, and the flag of Israel is lowered to half staff. A two-minute siren is sounded at 11:00 the following morning, which marks the opening of the official memorial ceremonies and private remembrance gatherings at each cemetery where our soldiers are buried. Israelis visit the resting places of loved ones throughout the day. The day officially draws to a close at sundown (between 19:00 and 20:00; 7–8 p.m.) in a ceremony at the national military cemetery on Mount Herzl, marking the start of Israel's Independence Day, when the flag of Israel is returned to full staff. The names of all the fallen are shown on television in chronological order (rank, name, Hebrew date deceased and secular date) over the course of the day. Names appear for about three seconds each. via DoubleTapper http://ift.tt/2pNAseR

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